Barkman Honey


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Taste a Walk on the Wild Side.

Bee meets wildflower. They spend quality time together. Then the delicious happens —100% pure raw honey that preserves the natural, naked goodness of their beautiful union.

So naturally, we call it Naked Wild Honey.

Sourced ethically and produced carefully by a select group of beekeepers who work hard to keep their bees healthy and happy, this pure wildflower honey is gently harvested and strained, and then minimally processed to retain natural pollen and enzymes.

All that, plus a delicious, full-bodied flavor that makes anything it touches more wonderful.

 

The Raw Facts on Naked Wild Honey.

  • 100% pure raw honey
  • Filled with natural pollen and enzymes
  • Sweetly robust, full-bodied flavor and aroma
  • Made from bees foraging wildflowers
  • Completely traceable to the source
  • Organic, state and regional varieties
 


Buy Naked Wild Honey, Right Here Right Now.

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AMERICAN

American Naked Wild Honey is produced entirely in the United States by millions of tireless honeybees, from the fertile river regions and orchards of the Pacific Northwest to the bountiful agricultural basins that flourish as far south as the Mojave Desert. Some of the major American sources include clover in the north central states, basswood in the Great Lakes region, citrus in Florida and California, blueberry in the northeast, cotton and tallow along the Gulf Coast, as well as an almost infinite variety of wildflowers. In addition, each year brings about a different combination of floral sources and flavors as varying temperatures and rainfall totals favor different flowering plants across the country.

The United States is among the top five largest honey-producing countries in the world, yielding more than 155 million pounds annually from 2.6 million colonies.

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ORGANIC

Brazil is one of the world’s leading producers of organic honey. That’s because Brazilian honey is produced largely from Africanized bees — a more aggressive and disease-resistant subspecies of honeybee. This resistance means Brazilian beekeepers can produce honey without the use of pesticides and antibiotics. Organic Naked Wild Honey is derived from two distinct regions of Brazil — the arid Northeast region, which produces a lighter-colored honey more delicate in flavor, and the more tropical southern region that produces a darker honey with a noticeably robust flavor.

Organic Naked Wild Honey is True Source Certified™— a voluntary system of origin traceability which validates, through an independent third party, that sourcing practices are in full compliance with U.S. and international trade laws.

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CALIFORNIA

California Naked Wild Honey is produced from the beautiful San Joaquin Valley in the heart of California to farms in the Mojave Desert as far south as San Bernardino County. Honeybees are extremely important to California agriculture, with fruits, nuts and vegetables depending on bee pollination for crop production. In fact, California almonds would not exist at all without nature's honeybees doing their magic.

California is among the top five largest honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding more than 12 million pounds annually from 320,000 colonies.

IDAHO

Idaho Naked Wild Honey is rich in nectars gleaned by honeybees from the Snake River Plain where primary source nectars include alfalfa seed, mint, onion seed, carrot seed and wildflowers.

Idaho is among the top 10 honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding nearly 3.5 million pounds annually from 100,000 colonies.

OREGON

Oregon Naked Wild Honey is produced on the western edge of the fertile Snake River Plain where main source nectars include onion seed, carrot seed, alfalfa seed, mint and wildflowers. Secondary nectar sources in Willamette Valley include carrot seed, alfalfa seed, blackberry, raspberry, meadowfoam and wildflowers.

Oregon is among the top 15 honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding nearly 3 million pounds annually from 71,000 colonies.

WASHINGTON

Washington Naked Wild Honey is primarily produced in the Lower Yakima River Valley where nectars are rich in alfalfa, buckwheat, mint and wildflowers.

Washington is among the top 15 honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding nearly 3 million pounds annually from 68,000 colonies.

FLORIDA

Florida Naked Wild Honey features a wide variety of nectar-producing plants. From Brazilian pepper and orange blossom in the south, to mangrove and gallberry in the coastal areas, and tupelo honey along the Apalachicola River in the panhandle, Florida regularly yields a surplus crop for beekeepers.

Florida is the fourth largest honey-producing state in the U.S., yielding nearly 12 million pounds annually from more than 220,000 colonies.

GREAT LAKES

Great Lakes Naked Wild Honey features a variety of unique floral source honeys, including basswood (linden) and starthistle (spotted knapweed), known for their exceptionally light color and distinct flavor. Due to the region’s cool northern climate, clover and alfalfa are also common, as are a wide abundance of wildflowers.

The Great Lakes region yields more than 21 million pounds of honey annually from more than 364,000 colonies. Additionally, Minnesota is among the top 10 largest honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding nearly 8 million pounds annually from more than 130,000 colonies.

GREAT PLAINS

Great Plains Naked Wild Honey is primarily comprised of high-quality clover honey, derived from yellow sweet clover, white sweet clover, red clover and Dutch clover. The region’s rich agricultural emphasis also yields alfalfa, canola and soybean honey, as well as sunflower honey from cultivated plots and natural stands.

The Great Plains region yields more than 97 million pounds of honey annually from nearly 1.2 million colonies. Not to mention, North Dakota is the top honey-producing state in the U.S., yielding more than 42 million pounds annually from 490,000 colonies.

TEXAS

Texas Naked Wild Honey is comprised primarily of Chinese tallow. A tree known for its beautiful white blossoms, Chinese tallow yields a mild honey that darkens quickly. Texas is also a leading producer of cotton honey, although reduced planting acreage and new cotton cultivars have decreased availability. Other common Texas honeys include mesquite and guajillo, both known for their light, unique flavor.

Texas is among the top 10 largest honey-producing states in the U.S., yielding more than 9 million pounds annually from 116,000 colonies.

SOUTHEAST

Southeast Naked Wild Honey is produced in two main foraging regions — the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain and the Appalachian-Ozark Upland. These regions feature a wide diversity of forage opportunities for honeybees, including orange blossom, gallberry, titi, Brazilian pepper, privet, basswood and cotton, in addition to many wildflowers. The region also offers a number of unique floral sources, such as tupelo, tulip poplar and sourwood.

The Southeast region yields nearly 19 million pounds of honey annually from more than 360,000 colonies. In fact, Florida is the fourth largest honey-producing state in the U.S., yielding nearly 12 million pounds annually from more than 220,000 colonies.

PAN-AMERICAN

Pan-American Naked Wild Honey is the delicious result of millions of tireless honeybees foraging nectar sources throughout the United States, Argentina and Canada. In addition to common American sources, including clover, basswood, citrus, cotton and tallow, Canadian honeybees commonly enjoy access to such plants as canola, buckwheat and blueberry. Argentina has a wide diversity of floral species to choose from, including citrus, chilca and eucalyptus in the subtropical northern provinces, as well as clover and sunflower in the prairie provinces. And most important, each locale provides an almost infinite variety of wildflowers. Interestingly, each year brings about a different combination of floral sources and flavors as varying temperatures and rainfall totals favor different flowering plants across these vast landscapes

The United States, Argentina and Canada are among the top honey-producing countries in the world, yielding more than 400 million pounds annually from more than 6 million honeybee colonies.

 

FAQs

What is raw honey?

While there’s no official definition for raw honey, the National Honey Board defines raw honey as the following*:

“Raw Honey: Honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling or straining without adding heat.

8a. Commercially Raw Honey: Honey as obtained by minimum processing. This product is often labeled as raw honey.”

And that’s exactly what Naked Wild Honey offers. Unlike standard honey, which is heated and filtered to remove air bubbles, wax particles and pollen grains, Naked Wild Honey is strained to preserve natural pollens and warmed just enough to help liquefy the solid honey crystals while protecting the natural enzymes, flavor and aroma present in the honey.

*National Honey Board. (1996, June 15). Definition of Honey and Honey Products. Retrieved from http://www.honey.com/images/uploads/general/honeydefs.pdf.

Is Naked Wild Honey a raw or minimally processed honey?

Naked Wild Honey is strained instead of filtered to preserve natural pollens, and warmed just enough to help liquefy the honey crystals while protecting the natural enzymes, flavor and aroma. With minimal processing, Naked Wild Honey brings pure, easy-to-pour honey to your table.

Is this honey pasteurized?

No.

What enzymes are present in Naked Wild Honey?

Diastase and invertase.

Does Naked Wild Honey contain pollen?

Yes, natural pollen has been retained in this product.

What type of honey is this and where does it come from?

Naked Wild Honey is predominantly made from wildflower nectar and thus would be considered a wildflower honey, which has a more robust, full-bodied flavor and darker color. Produced by carefully selected beekeepers, you will find our honey’s place of origin printed clearly on the label.

Will this honey crystallize or become solid?

It is perfectly natural and likely for pure raw honey to crystallize over time. If it does solidify, simply place the container in warm water and gently warm until the honey returns to its liquid form. Do not refrigerate. Do not microwave in plastic container.

My Naked Wild Honey has crystallized. Can I get a replacement?

Because honey in its natural state will crystallize or solidify, it is our policy to not replace honey that has crystallized. In fact, crystallization is more likely to occur in raw and minimally processed honey products like Naked Wild Honey. Honey is edible and enjoyable in its crystallized form and may be re-liquefied by placing the container in warm water until the honey returns to its liquid form. Do not refrigerate. Do not microwave in plastic container.